Teaching Your Child The Importance of Sharing

_MG_0842

Children have a difficult time sharing their things, especially when they are young. Learning how to share is a very important part of the growing process. Children need to learn how good it feels to give and that it’s fun to share with friends and family.

Don’t scold your child if they don’t immediately know that they need to share. Children have a tendency to get attached to things and people. Teaching them to share can be a difficult task, and it requires a lot of patience. You need to try and understand why your child might not want to share and take it from there.

Here are a few tips to help your child learn the importance of sharing:

1. Don’t force a child to share: To you the toys don’t mean much, but to a child they are his prized possessions. Instead of insisting that they share all their things try and create an environment that encourages your child to share.

2. Take them or invite their friends for play dates: Let them plan ahead and choose some of their favorite things to share before the other children arrive.

3. Teach them how to take turns: Tell them that they can play with a toy for a while, but they will have to give it to someone else after some time. Take the children to a park with swings.

4. Be firm with them: Tell them that they will not get what they want if they don’t learn how to share.

5. Sharing requires empathy: Children find it difficult to show true empathy under the age of six. So don’t be harsh if they do not learn immediately. Be kind and generous yourself, and the child will eventually learn.

6. There are some things the child will never want to share: There is always a blanket or a toy that a child is extremely attached to. Don’t expect them to share that.

7. Let them learn themselves: If a child is does not share his things with other children or grabs a lot then children won’t want to play with him. He will automatically start sharing so he can make friends.

8. Play games: Incorporate rules that require the child to share or take turns when playing with them. Children remember what they have learned through play than what they learn through lectures.

9. Teach by example: When you are giving something to someone make it a teachable moment. For e.g. While returning something to your partner say “Mom is sharing this with dad.” or “Look, dad and mom are sharing this popcorn while we watch a movie.”

10. Be the bystander: Sometimes what they learn on their own has a more lasting impact than what you try to teach them. Give children space to work it out amongst themselves. Don’t go running to stop every fight your child gets into.

A child gives as he is given to. Teach your child to communicate his needs to his friends. If the child is fighting with his sibling, don’t take sides. Just take away the thing causing the argument so no one wins. The child may sulk at first, but will forget about it soon.

Learn to respect the attachment the child has with his things. At the same time teach them that sharing is very important. Show them how happy the other person becomes when they share. They will start sharing just to see a smile on the other person’s face. 🙂

How To Make A Career In Market Research

New Picture

Research has always been an integral part of Marketing-it helps companies stay competitive and avoid the high costs of poor decisions based on unsound information.

There are many different roles that you can assume within the field of Market Research. To secure a job, you must have knowledge or experience in the field, and know how to demonstrate that knowledge to employers. As a market researcher, you gather information about the competition or the market and then analyze it to find the best ways to gain an advantage over the competitors.

Remember that a job in Market Research involves a lot of fieldwork. So, be prepared for the run-around. Here are some tips that will help you prepare for a career in Market Research:

1. The main task of a market researcher is to gather and analyse the market so take all the Marketing courses you can.

2. Take courses in Statistics and Quantitative Methods.

3. Acquire internet and computer skills. Knowledge of programming languages is an added asset.

4. Take courses in Psychology and Consumer Behaviour.

5. Acquire effective written and verbal communications skills.

6. Learn to think creatively.

7. You can get a job in Market Research with a Bachelor’s degree, like BBA. You don’t always need an MBA, but many employers prefer it.

8. The most common entry-level position is of an Operational Supervisor or a Junior Research Analyst.

9. There is a lot of scope to learn on-the-job. The field requires a lot of people from a variety of backgrounds.

10. Technical posts like statisticians require a strong background in statistics.

11. Some of the positions available include Vice President of Marketing Research, Research Director, Assistant Director of Research, Project Manager, Statistician, Data Processing Specialist, Analysts, Fieldwork Director, etc.

12. Some research jobs require you to study the effects of a product’s package or advertisements on consumers. Or you may have to analyse market statistics or even asked to develop completely new products.

13. Getting some related skills and experience will help you stand out in interviews. Try and get an internship that helps you learn about the field.

For the best preparation for a career in Marketing Research refer to “Careers in Marketing Research by Naresh K Malhotra and Satyabhushan Dash”: bit.ly/1Cf5QD6.

This book helps to master skills related to Marketing Research, from assessing information needs to providing the company with relevant, accurate, reliable and current information, and assisting marketing decision-making in a very effective way. The research process discussed in the book is not limited to just marketing, but applies to any area of management.

Raising Entrepreneurial Kids for Tomorrow

Image 1

All parents dream that their children, one day, will be successful in what they do. In this pursuit, they send them to the best schools and colleges, so they can secure good jobs. Most parents tend to look at a stable job as the best career option for their children, therefore overlooking the importance of encouraging their child’s entrepreneurial tendencies.

Our children are the future, and we can help them become tomorrow’s leaders by nurturing their entrepreneurial spirit from a young age. So, what makes someone an entrepreneur, and what can you do to help your child become one? You can begin by honing these skills and qualities in your child early on in their lives:

1. Confidence: Children who are confident often stand out in the crowd. Give them challenging tasks, and drop hints that will help them if they get stuck. The feeling that they were able to finish something difficult will give their confidence the boost it needs.

2. Passion: Entrepreneurs are passionate about what they do. Encourage your children to do what they love. Teach them to follow their dreams.

3. Creativity: It is said that a child’s imagination is bigger than the universe. Children are extremely creative. Parents must nurture that creativity, and channel their energy in the right direction.

4. Communication Skills: Teach them all types of communication. It will help them share their vision with others. Learning different languages will help your child in many fields.

5. Risk taking: Children need to be taught how to take calculated, well-informed risks. They need to be comfortable with the idea of risk taking from the beginning. Don’t try to over shelter your children. Teach them that any failure is a learning opportunity to do better in the future.

6. Perseverance and hard work: “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.” Everyone works hard, but it is important not to give up when you fail. Boost your child’s problem-solving skills. If they face any problem help them by brainstorming with them.

7. Optimism: Teach your children that failure is just a part of life, and that they should not fear it. They should learn to look forward to their future. It is important to have a positive attitude toward failure. When they fail, ask them to think about how they could have done things differently.

8. Initiative: Teach your children to be go-getters. Let your children be independent and take their own decisions sometimes like what to have for dinner or what to wear for a picnic. As they grow older you can trust them with bigger decisions.

9. Leadership: Your children can be leaders from the beginning. A good leader not only thinks big, but also motivates others to do so. Teach your child good interpersonal skills.

10. Planning: A great way to help your child is to teach them the importance of planning. If they face any problem ask them not to jump on it, but to think about it and make a plan. Don’t give them a solution. Let them figure it out themselves.

11. Exploring: Let your children explore through books, games and the internet. Closely monitor what they do. The internet offers many tools like prezi.com, weebly.com or canva.com that can help children learn new skills like designing, editing, even making their own websites.

Encourage your children to be curious, and let them know that no idea is a bad idea. As a parent, you can inspire entrepreneurial skills in your child by letting them be themselves and leading by example. Teaching your children these skills will help them solve problems, lead others, ask questions, learn from mistakes, and more importantly it will remind them to never give up, be creative, save money, ask for help and find solutions instead of problems. 🙂

How To Improve Your Child’s Vocabulary

Vocabulary
“Communication – the human connection – is the key to personal and career success.”

– Paul J. Meyer

From the moment they utter their first word, parents experience the unmatched joy of watching the incredible growth in their child’s expression of themselves. Vocabulary is the most helpful tool for communication. This is why one of the greatest gifts you can give to your child is to help them build their vocabulary. The key is a commitment to regularly learning new words.

You can help your child cultivate a good vocabulary at a young age. Here’s how:
1. Children start developing a vocabulary during infancy. They imitate words that they hear from adults, and associate those words with objects or actions. Talk to them, but remember to remove empty fillers from your speech by reducing the use of word’s like “um” and “ah.”

2. No matter how difficult, parents should work on giving up baby talk, while asking friends and family to do the same. Baby-talk confuses children. Talk to them the way that you’d speak to anybody else.

3. When the child is young, and can’t read, parents should read aloud to them.

4. Try and play word games with them. For example, play a game called “word of the day”, in which you teach them a new word every day. If they remember the seven new words at the end of the week, take them to their favourite place or give them something they like. Games like Scrabble, Word Search, Word Jumble have been designed to help children improve their vocabulary.

5. When they are able to memorise seven words easily start upping the ante. Try teaching them 10 words next week.

6. The way you teach your child is also critical to your child’s ability to learn. Show them books with pictures and words to help them learn through association. Use words that might interest or fascinate them while talking to them–they’ll ask you for the meaning themselves!

7. Teach your child to look up words they don’t recognize. As your child grows up, it’ll become easier for you to help them build their vocabulary. Encourage them to ask questions, use a dictionary every time they don’t understand a word and pick up a thesaurus when they are working on writing assignments such as essays.

8. Reading is imperative to improving language skills. It’s typically easier for children to learn more words when they are growing up. Children who make reading a habit, tend to learn more words than those who do not. This is true for all languages.

9. Comic books are a great way to learn new words and develop an early interest in reading. Ask them to articulate and share their opinion about their current reads.

10. Get them a library membership or urge them to bring home new books from the school library. Encourage them to listen to podcasts like NPR.

11. Once the child starts reading and writing they learn more words, ask them to start a journal or write letters. It’s a great practice, and it will also help them be more organized.

12. Do the crossword with your children. Help them at first, and eventually you would find that they would be doing it themselves.

13. Keep a vocabulary notepad for extremely difficult words.

14. Remember that they should practice putting your new words into their writing and speaking. It’s very difficult to retain a word if we are not using it regularly.

Speak to your child about your day. Tell them about the things you did and the people you encountered. Don’t miss any funny details. This will help them understand storytelling outside the realms of a book. Ask them to do the same and tell you about their day using the new words they’ve learnt. A good vocabulary will help your children at all stages in life. We use language to express ourselves every day. It may be difficult to memorize large words daily, but there are many ways to make it fun. You’ll start enjoying watching your child grow one word at a time. 🙂

Classrooms: The Temples of Growth and Knowledge

Inside My Classroom

Students are eager and active when it comes to learning and imbibing, this may be from individuals, surroundings or events. Their thirst for knowledge and the drive to grow makes them work relentlessly to inspect and inquire. Teachers play a pivotal role in giving direction and guiding the way to a more informed and clearer approach to their future. Without saying a lot, teachers and their tools of education leave everlasting impressions on how their students think and work.

Good teaching is the right mix of thought provoking ideas, values, productive knowledge and the atmosphere to prosper. Teachers depend on classrooms, their sanctuaries of learning, to allow students to feel comfortable yet compelled to inculcate, safe yet prone to struggle with knowledge. The greatest teachers have been those who have not only possessed great knowledge but also the right medium and method of imparting that knowledge. Children need to be provided the environment which challenges them with ample pressure, high expectations and even higher motivation.

A pleasant and relaxing, clean and well organized classroom environment promotes positivity and a more clear-headed approach to the process of learning. Classrooms are where students can laugh and learn, question and imbibe; whereas teachers can establish routines and set ground rules, preach and lead. Students and teachers collaborate to accomplish tasks, although the students should have the freedom to express themselves, it is absolutely imperative for them to understand that the teacher is the figure of authority in a classroom at all times. Handling the responsibility of having authority over his/her students is a tough task and not something that comes naturally, the greatest educators have given their students freedom and confidence to spread their wings and fly to newer horizons; inquisitive and firm, steadfast and curious.

Like the safety and security of their homes, concern and compassion of their parents; classrooms ought to make students feel in their own comfort zone and the words of their teachers as pearls of wisdom aimed to get the best out of them. Whilst pushing the boundaries of learning, classrooms do not limit the brimming minds of student to just the confines of the four walls, practised theories and existing ideals.

A classroom is where the mind is moulded and basked in the rays of knowledge, a place where the mind is open and eager but constricted and directed within the boundaries of growth and learning. Here the educator is the leader, the mentor, the guardian of the impressionable yet fully potential minds. Minds which are safe guarded and protected till they blossom and are ready to take on the world with their varied academic and creative skills and treasured values to lead a happy and prosperous life.

“A ship in harbour is safe – but that is not what ships are for.”
– John A. Shedd