The Use of Reward In Positive Parenting

Father Holding Daughter's Hand

The Use of Reward In Positive Parenting

Children are born curious. There is a whole new world to explore and most of their behaviour is adopted from adults, particularly their parents. Whatever be the age of your child, teaching them the benefits of discipline could be rewarding in the long run. Tangible rewards or social reinforcements are the most effective way to incentivise your child for their behaviour.

Rewarding good behaviour promotes learning and also helps parents to focus on their kids right doings. Tangible rewards can lead to a regular habit of greed–getting something in exchange for good behaviour; therefore, the motivation for good behaviour fades as the incentives stops. Instead, rewarding in the form of verbal encouragement and motivation can sustain internal motivation.

Let’s take a look at some tips on how to reward your child effectively for good behaviour:

Model an ultimate rewarding strategy of self-satisfaction and discipline.

Teach your kids how to take responsibility and ownership of their behaviour and get satisfaction from their own good deeds. For example, “My mom enrolled me for a dance class once I started keeping my room clean.” “I feel good about cleaning my room.”

Identify the type of incentives that would keep your child motivated.

A deep sense of emotional attachment motivates children. Rewards such as hugs, a pat on the shoulder, smiles, and positive attention works best for kids in understanding that they have done something worthwhile. Tangible rewards such as toys, money, treats, etc. can be effective too, but should not be given very often.

Positive reinforcement can be effective when started early.

Shower your toddlers with effusive praise, preschoolers with daily rewards, elementary children with documenting rewards charts. This will instill a sense of self-esteem at a young age. The incentives can be a special outing or a small toy for a week-long good behaviour.

Make good behaviour a daily habit.

Teach your kid how to follow a set routine by completing the non-fun stuff first, and then enjoying the fun stuff. This will help them start taking responsibilities. This isn’t a reward, but as parents and teachers, (Pearson School) it’s your responsibility to make good behaviour a habit, a daily routine both at school and at home.

Use consistent rewards to promote good behaviour with gradual decrease of rewards later.

Regular rewards could be fun, but stopping them could be daunting for parents. Positive reinforcement or rewards should be temporary as it helps in teaching a disciplined life. When the desired behaviour is learnt, providing irregular incentives will make good behaviour likely to persist. Ultimately your child’s self-satisfaction and self-approval will be rewarding enough to maintain that expected behaviour.

What should be an appropriate reward to promote good behaviour, in your opinion? Write to us in the comments!

5 Ways To Help Your Teen Understand The Value of Money

6848822477_11c5a7dfab_b

It’s said that one of the greatest gifts you can give your child is to prepare them to be a responsible adult with money. As parents it’s your responsibility towards your children to help them develop a frame of mind that understands the value of money. When your child starts to believe that money can buy them anything and everything, they don’t understand where to stop or their limits. It’s in the interest of parents and their child alike to instill a sense of financial responsibility from early childhood through their teen years.

Let’s take a look at some tips and tricks to prepare your child to manage his/her finances:

Teach them how to manage their limited budget.

Start teaching your kids about money early in life so that it becomes a habit. If they get easy money they will never value it. Fix their allowances. Make them earn their allowance rather than just providing it for free. Once you’ve given them their allowance, let them buy stuff they want. They will soon understand that being a spendthrift is not the right attitude as they won’t be able to afford anything new until their next allowance. This is how they will learn how to manage with their limited allowance.

There is no bank with unlimited supply of money.

It’s important for kids to understand that money is not an inexhaustible, limitless resource. Let them manage their finances but let them learn to avoid unnecessary expenses. Ask them to help you with the household budget. Take them to the store with you, let them watch you pay the bill and that’s when they will understand the real cost of things and what they can buy and what they cannot within their budget.

Practise how to stay within a budget.

Once you’ve given your child allowance, help them prioritize their expenses. Help your kids to make a list of the important things they want and urge them to keep a separate amount for unexpected spendings. The best way is to allot a daily budget and to assign dates to all the expenses and this is where parents need to guide their kids. Help your children to create a budget worksheet in order to track the flow of money.

Set a good example as parents.

Children mimic their parents even while managing finances. So, if you’re a person who uses a credit card often, your kid will follow the same pattern; and if you are someone who saves a little amount every time you buy something, your kid will value money the same way. One way is to include your kid in your financial decisions like buying something online and how you consider good deals before spending your hard-earned money. Don’t hesitate to share your financial mistakes and your learnings. Giving an example is easy, but setting one is difficult.

Developing a habit to save.

Learning to save money is a vital skill. Talking to your teens about saving money may seem like a daunting task, but it shouldn’t stop you from encouraging your kid to save little amount for their short-term goals such as buying a dress, football or cricket bat. Teaching your kids long-term saving can help them achieve long term goals, such as buying a car, house, and so on in future.

Being a parent is a full-time job, and this job comes with a lot of responsibilities. Inculcating good habits like understanding the value of money in your children is only going to make things easier for them in the future. So, chart out a plan, get set on the task, and make your kids responsible adults who know the value of money.

Help Your Child Become A Better Questioner

Pearson School

The human race is curious by nature; without the curiosity of certain human beings, we would still be stuck in the stone age. Curious minds urge people to question the why, what, how, and when of things. Asking questions opens-up a vast matrix of information floating around to dig upon and comprehend.

Students–the younger ones, especially–are the most curious of all the human beings. Students who are curious and ask questions are the ones who seriously seek answers too. It is no hidden fact that asking questions is an indispensable tool. Questioning can help learn, explore and adapt to changes.

In our educational system, we often find that while answers are applauded and questions are seen as a sign of weakness. It’s therefore the parent’s and the teacher’s combined responsibility to provide a conducive environment for kids to ask questions.

There are several ways in which you can encourage your child to ask questions in the classroom and even outside it, here are some of them:

Provide A Safe Haven For Questioning

Asking questions can be scary for kids especially when most of the kids perceive questioning to be a weakness, or an ego issue in front of other classmates. Teachers must take the responsibility to change the game by designing an environment where asking question seems interesting and welcoming, and where curiosity is rewarded. Parents must do the same at home by treating the ability to question as a strength and not a weakness.

Make Questioning The New Cool

Kids at school are under the impression that it is “cool” to know everything or ignore it if they don’t. What if parents (and teachers like they do in Pearson Schools) take the responsibility to help kids understand that asking questions is the greatest sign of intellect? Give your children (and students) examples of Sir Isaac Newton or Alexander Fleming, who were the explorers, mavericks, rebels–and the coolest of the lot.

Questioning Can Be A Playful Activity

Kids enjoy learning things if it is learnt with an element of play involved. There are countless ways to inject a game element in the exercise of questioning, like converting answers into questions, making it an open-ended question, or a closed question. Designing questions with Why, What, and How, to  encourage students to tap into their questioning abilities making it a fun activity.

Make Questioning Challenging and Rewarding

Aim to create a path for the students to find a meaningful answer to every question without Googling it. The whole point is to make students spend some time thinking over questions, grappling with them, and coming up with a result after complete understanding–something that could lead to a well deserved reward!

Make Questioning A Habit

All the above mentioned activities are to create a lifelong habit to question and learn, and to pave a path to develop it into a behaviour. People who question are the ones who learn to observe things differently. Every parent must inculcate in their children the habit to question and then articulate.

What are some ways in which you inculcate the habit of questioning at home and/or classroom?

How To Get The Most Out of Parent-Teacher Meetings

Screen Shot 2015-08-06 at 1.13.40 pmParent-Teacher Meetings present a great opportunity for you to learn about your child’s school life, their performance, and social developments. As a parent, you also get to know your child’s teachers and make plans about how you can work with them to support your child better. Furthermore, while attending the meeting you’re able to let your child know that you care about their progress.

The faculty at Pearson Schools specifically, are just as interested in your input as you are in theirs. Your child’s teachers will want you to apprise them with your child’s comfort level in the classroom, whether they’ve found a best friend yet, and whether the classes are having a positive impact on them. This will help you and your child’s teacher understand his social and emotional well-being and ultimately his performance in class.

Let’s look at how To Get The Most Out of Parent-Teacher Meetings:

BEFORE THE PARENT-TEACHER MEETING

Prepare early: Keep a check on all the test scores and home assignments from the beginning of the school year. Make a note about the things your child told you or any specific issue you might want to address.

Speak with your child: Get access to your child’s school life. Ask them about what happens when they reach school and in the class, about their teacher and their new friends. You need to find out your child’s perception, both positives as well as negatives.

DURING THE PARENT-TEACHER MEETING

Be punctual: Every parent is allotted a fixed time. Ensure that you make it on time so that your child’s teacher can give you and your child the attention you deserve.

Meet with a positive attitude: The goal of the meeting should be the success of your child. Rather than engaging in arguments, have an approach where you and your child’s teacher can help your child do their best in school. Don’t restrain yourself from complimenting the teacher for your child’s performance. Don’t hesitate from making notes regarding your child’s scope to improve.  Understand your child’s learning style and needs, and then share the information with your child.

AFTER THE PARENT-TEACHER MEETING

Check your notes from the meeting: Going through your notes will help you address the issues that your child’s teacher had pointed out in the meeting. Work out the steps to put the plan into action.

Brief your child: Apprise your child about their core strengths and weaknesses. Talk about the areas they need to work on and how you can help. Compliment them on their performance in class and help them follow the tips they can use to improve it.

While attending Parent-Teacher Meetings could be yet another point in a parent’s to-do list, the aim should always be to enhance the Parent–Teacher relationship to help your child reach their maximum potential.

How to Help Your School Going Children Overcome Bullying

How to Help Your School Going Children Overcome Bullying

Bullying is one of the most prevalent social evils, and it leaves a lasting impact on the victims, especially children. In most cases, kids say that bullying takes place in school. Most cases bullying happens in school, tuitions, online or on the playground. Most of the time bullying is verbal, but sometimes it may lead to someone getting seriously hurt. If your child is being bullied, you need to find a way to put an end to it as soon as possible. There are many ways in which bullying takes place like teasing, hitting, cyber-bullying or mean gossip. It’s important to discuss bullying with your child so they are prepared if it ever happens. Let them know that they can come to you with their problems.

Identify Bullying

Being teased by a sibling or friends is not bullying, but games children play for fun. It’s not harmful if done playfully, and in a friendly and mutual way. It usually ends with both children laughing and forgetting about it very soon. When the teasing crosses a line and becomes hurtful and unkind, it turns into bullying, and needs to stop immediately. Bullying is intentionally hurting someone. It can be physical, verbal, or even psychological. Bullying needs to be taken seriously and not brushed aside as something children should deal with on their own. It’s known to have a serious effect on a child’s sense of security and self-worth. Name-calling, pushing, hitting, teasing, and, taking a child’s money are all acts of bullying. Children who are bullied are often ignored or shunned by other classmates as well.

Cyber Bullying

With the dawn of the Internet Age, bullying has moved into cyberspace now. Cyber bullying can happen anywhere, at home, email, via text, and social media websites throughout the day. For the victims, the effects can be lasting and devastating, leaving them feeling hurt, angry, humiliated, or depressed. Bullies target young, vulnerable children and taunt them to hurt their feelings. A lot of times this is done using anonymous profiles. These tips can help protect your child from cyber bullies:

  1. The first step would be that the parents should learn about the Internet and be abreast of social media & it’s use.
  2. Almost all websites have an minimum age requirement. Parents should pay special attention to this. Install parental control filtering software, it’s just as important for you to monitor your child’s computer.
  3. Talk to your child about cyber bullying and tell them it is harmful and unacceptable. Ask them not to reply to the bully and to come to you if any stranger contacts them online or if one of their friends is being rude.
  4. Ask them not to say anything online that they wouldn’t say to a person’s face.
  5. Ask them to save the evidence of the cyber bullying. Keep all the abusive texts or take a screenshot of the page, and report it to the school, parents or, the concerned authorities.
  6. Prevent any communication with the cyber bully. Block their email address, phone number, and delete them from all social media. Talk to them about appropriate internet behavior.
  7. You can even report them to their internet service provider (ISP) or to the websites they are using to bully.

Helping Your Child Cope

  1. Don’t let them blame themselves. Tell them it’s not their fault, and no matter what a bully says or does, they should not be ashamed of who they are.
  2. Help them look at bullies from a different perspective. Say the bullies are unhappy and frustrated people who want to feel good by hurting you.
  3. Tell them not to think about what the bully says or does.
  4. Ask them to talk to an adult they trust about bullies.
  5. Boost their self-confidence. Play games, exercise, crack jokes with your children.
  6. Let them focus on their hobbies or do things they enjoy to help them get over what the bully said to them.

Bullying can have a lasting effect on your child so don’t let it slide. No parent wants to see their child being bullied or being a bully, but a lot of children are involved – either as a perpetrator, victim or witness. Young children are particularly vulnerable. Work with your child and his teacher if your child is being bullied till the problem stops.

Follow our Facebook page for more schools and parenting tips to help your child learn & develop better. Give your child the best education. Enquire for admissions here.

Teaching Your Child The Importance of Sharing

_MG_0842

Children have a difficult time sharing their things, especially when they are young. Learning how to share is a very important part of the growing process. Children need to learn how good it feels to give and that it’s fun to share with friends and family.

Don’t scold your child if they don’t immediately know that they need to share. Children have a tendency to get attached to things and people. Teaching them to share can be a difficult task, and it requires a lot of patience. You need to try and understand why your child might not want to share and take it from there.

Here are a few tips to help your child learn the importance of sharing:

1. Don’t force a child to share: To you the toys don’t mean much, but to a child they are his prized possessions. Instead of insisting that they share all their things try and create an environment that encourages your child to share.

2. Take them or invite their friends for play dates: Let them plan ahead and choose some of their favorite things to share before the other children arrive.

3. Teach them how to take turns: Tell them that they can play with a toy for a while, but they will have to give it to someone else after some time. Take the children to a park with swings.

4. Be firm with them: Tell them that they will not get what they want if they don’t learn how to share.

5. Sharing requires empathy: Children find it difficult to show true empathy under the age of six. So don’t be harsh if they do not learn immediately. Be kind and generous yourself, and the child will eventually learn.

6. There are some things the child will never want to share: There is always a blanket or a toy that a child is extremely attached to. Don’t expect them to share that.

7. Let them learn themselves: If a child is does not share his things with other children or grabs a lot then children won’t want to play with him. He will automatically start sharing so he can make friends.

8. Play games: Incorporate rules that require the child to share or take turns when playing with them. Children remember what they have learned through play than what they learn through lectures.

9. Teach by example: When you are giving something to someone make it a teachable moment. For e.g. While returning something to your partner say “Mom is sharing this with dad.” or “Look, dad and mom are sharing this popcorn while we watch a movie.”

10. Be the bystander: Sometimes what they learn on their own has a more lasting impact than what you try to teach them. Give children space to work it out amongst themselves. Don’t go running to stop every fight your child gets into.

A child gives as he is given to. Teach your child to communicate his needs to his friends. If the child is fighting with his sibling, don’t take sides. Just take away the thing causing the argument so no one wins. The child may sulk at first, but will forget about it soon.

Learn to respect the attachment the child has with his things. At the same time teach them that sharing is very important. Show them how happy the other person becomes when they share. They will start sharing just to see a smile on the other person’s face. 🙂

7 Ways To Help Your Child Develop Self-Discipline

blogtitle-03
Self-control is the first step to self-discipline. It’s important for those who want to become successful in life. Children need to be taught the value of self-discipline from an early age. Every time your child accepts a limit that set by you, they are practicing self-control.

Developing self-control can be a lifelong process for some. By learning self-control at a young age, children can respond to stressful situations in ways that yield positive outcomes. To help your child develop self-control, follow these 7 steps:

1. Practice what you preach. Managing your emotions in front of your children is very important. Remember that your actions send a clear message to your children about how to deal with various situations in life. If you are calm during stressful situations your child will also learn to be calm. Compassion is another thing children learn from their parents.

2. The foundation of any relationship is trust. Parents need to be responsive to their children’s needs to foster trust. When a baby is fed it understands that food will come. Soothing your child will help him regulate his emotions. You will also teach him how to soothe himself, and give him a feeling of safety and acceptance.

3. Developing the brain is an important step. Children cannot resist grabbing whatever comes in front of them. They also have very little idea about what is good or bad. Parents have to develop that understanding in them. This is a long process that takes a lot of practice. The brain’s development takes place in many ways. Reading a wide variety of books, sports, art, etc. are excellent ways to develop a child’s mind.

4. Keep practicing. A child needs to understand how to prioritize. They will want one thing, but there will be another thing that they want more. They need to understand that they cannot always get what they want. Giving them a choice between two things will help them understand the importance of making decisions. They will be able to associate it with self-discipline. Remember that it has to be the child’s decision. When they are forced to give something up, they are not practicing self-discipline. If they are not given the chance to choose between two alternatives, they cannot practice controlling themselves.

5. Punishment doesn’t encourage self-discipline. The right kind of limits give children practice in self-discipline. If the child isn’t choosing to stop what they were doing; they are being forced. In this case the child doesn’t feel the need to stop himself. The point is to motivate them to discipline themselves, and not punishing them.

6. Patience is an essential step. Patience is a virtue, and most find it very difficult to be patient in difficult situations. Every time we exercise self-control, we build our ability to draw on it to meet our goals. You cannot expect your child to be patient when he is young. It’s something that they develop gradually. If you’re asking them to be patient, then make sure that the amount of time they have to wait coincides with their ability to wait patiently or they would resort to screaming to get what they want instead of learning self-control. Don’t be impatient, and yell at your child to wait. They will see it as punishment.

7. Children learn self-control on their own too. Do not underestimate your child. They can develop self-control when they’re motivated by something important to them. Playing with other children requires them to manage their emotions. Cooking or baking teaches them to wait till the food is ready and not put it in their mouth when it is hot. Playing their favorite game helps them understand that they need to practice in order to get good at it.

Every time children have to manage themselves, they learn a strategy that helps them in the future. Teaching children self-control is about teaching them to regulate their emotions, which allows them to regulate their thoughts and behaviour.