Facilitate a productive Parent-Teacher Meeting

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It’s evident that any parent would have a vested interest in knowing about the development of their child at all times. However, when it comes to schooling, there’s a significant gap every weekday during school hours, where the transparency of information related to this development is lacking. This mandates the need to set up a parent-teacher meeting so that the parents can be informed about the performance and progress of the child in his or her respective school.

However, the parent-teacher meeting can be so much more than just that. It’s not just the teacher’s opinion that matters – the input of parents is also vital to ensure that the overall development of the child is at optimal levels. The child’s comfort level, social life, and personal growth are all factors that can be positively affected through a mutually productive parent-teacher meeting.

So, how should one prepare to facilitate a productive parent-teacher meeting?

BEFORE THE MEETING:

  • Keep track of all the developments of the child from the ground-up. Pinpoint any specific issues that you feel need to be addressed, so that you can bring up these points of discussion during the meeting.
  • Talk candidly with your child about his school life. Doing so will allow you to understand their likes and dislikes in the classroom, what they learn about all day, how the teachers interact with them, and any other relevant information.

DURING THE MEETING:

  • If you want to facilitate a productive discussion in the first place, then the first thing to keep in mind is to be punctual. If you’re not willing to respect the teacher’s time, then how will you expect them to do the same?
  • Try and maintain a positive attitude at all times. Being argumentative is okay at times, but keeping the same approach during a parent-teacher meeting is not recommended in the slightest. Make notes, listen attentively, and understand the best way to augment the growth of your child.

AFTER THE MEETING:

  • If you’ve taken notes, then read up on them and reflect on what was told to you at the meeting. Keeping these pointers in mind will help you direct the growth of your child in an effective manner.
  • Talk with your child after the meeting and go over all the points that were covered. Praise them for their strengths and mutually figure out the course of action that can be taken to overcome their weaknesses.

Attending the parent-teacher meeting should be more than just a to-do on your list – it should be a productive meetup that will benefit the student, teacher, and the parent equally.

2 thoughts on “Facilitate a productive Parent-Teacher Meeting

  1. How to deal as a teacher with the parents of weak children?suggestions be kind and good to them but then they do not get the true picture and remain happy with the work of their child

    • Hi, Subrata. We believe the first step is to move from a “fixed mindset” to a “growth mindset”. Stop thinking of the student as a weak student; instead instil in him/her and the parents that while the student is not the best in a certain field of studies today, he/she will progress with learning. Set the child up for success instead. Parents often replicate the attitude of a teacher towards the student at home. So, there’s a high chance that by repeatedly telling them that their child is weak, they will reinforce the belief at home. This will not help the child’s self-esteem in any manner and will only make him/her stop trying. Encourage the child for his/her efforts and inspire them to do better in the future! You’ll be surprised how quickly students can transform with the right kind of support. 🙂

      If you have any specific questions regarding the parents’ attitude. Do let us know.

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