How To Get The Most Out of Parent-Teacher Meetings

Screen Shot 2015-08-06 at 1.13.40 pmParent-Teacher Meetings present a great opportunity for you to learn about your child’s school life, their performance, and social developments. As a parent, you also get to know your child’s teachers and make plans about how you can work with them to support your child better. Furthermore, while attending the meeting you’re able to let your child know that you care about their progress.

The faculty at Pearson Schools specifically, are just as interested in your input as you are in theirs. Your child’s teachers will want you to apprise them with your child’s comfort level in the classroom, whether they’ve found a best friend yet, and whether the classes are having a positive impact on them. This will help you and your child’s teacher understand his social and emotional well-being and ultimately his performance in class.

Let’s look at how To Get The Most Out of Parent-Teacher Meetings:

BEFORE THE PARENT-TEACHER MEETING

Prepare early: Keep a check on all the test scores and home assignments from the beginning of the school year. Make a note about the things your child told you or any specific issue you might want to address.

Speak with your child: Get access to your child’s school life. Ask them about what happens when they reach school and in the class, about their teacher and their new friends. You need to find out your child’s perception, both positives as well as negatives.

DURING THE PARENT-TEACHER MEETING

Be punctual: Every parent is allotted a fixed time. Ensure that you make it on time so that your child’s teacher can give you and your child the attention you deserve.

Meet with a positive attitude: The goal of the meeting should be the success of your child. Rather than engaging in arguments, have an approach where you and your child’s teacher can help your child do their best in school. Don’t restrain yourself from complimenting the teacher for your child’s performance. Don’t hesitate from making notes regarding your child’s scope to improve.  Understand your child’s learning style and needs, and then share the information with your child.

AFTER THE PARENT-TEACHER MEETING

Check your notes from the meeting: Going through your notes will help you address the issues that your child’s teacher had pointed out in the meeting. Work out the steps to put the plan into action.

Brief your child: Apprise your child about their core strengths and weaknesses. Talk about the areas they need to work on and how you can help. Compliment them on their performance in class and help them follow the tips they can use to improve it.

While attending Parent-Teacher Meetings could be yet another point in a parent’s to-do list, the aim should always be to enhance the Parent–Teacher relationship to help your child reach their maximum potential.

2 thoughts on “How To Get The Most Out of Parent-Teacher Meetings

  1. How to deal as a teacher with the parents of weak children?suggestions be kind and good to them but then they do not get the true picture and remain happy with the work of their child

    • Hi, Subrata. We believe the first step is to move from a “fixed mindset” to a “growth mindset”. Stop thinking of the student as a weak student; instead instil in him/her and the parents that while the student is not the best in a certain field of studies today, he/she will progress with learning. Set the child up for success instead. Parents often replicate the attitude of a teacher towards the student at home. So, there’s a high chance that by repeatedly telling them that their child is weak, they will reinforce the belief at home. This will not help the child’s self-esteem in any manner and will only make him/her stop trying. Encourage the child for his/her efforts and inspire them to do better in the future! You’ll be surprised how quickly students can transform with the right kind of support. 🙂

      If you have any specific questions regarding the parents’ attitude. Do let us know.

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